Archives for September 2014

Travel Snacks for Car: Candied Popcorn

2014-09-08 16.06.03Popcorn is a simple, healthy, and cheap snack, and it vacuums up easily when needed. If you are looking for a new snack mix for traveling, give this recipe a try.

Simple Candied Popcorn Recipe

Melt 3 blocks of almond bark candy in the microwave 1 minute. Stir and heat another 30 seconds until hot and smooth. Don’t over heat.

Pop one batch of air popcorn into a large bowl and drizzle with melted bark. Stir very well. Add candy sprinkles, crushed pretzels, or leave it plain. Allow to cool and the bark to harden. Store in airtight container.

Do you have other ideas or “go to” favorites for travel snacks for car trips? Let us know in the comments or post on our Facebook page.

How to Read the Side of Your Tire

how to read the side of your tireThe side of your tire is called a “sidewall”, and it contains important information about your tire. While you many not need to know some of this information during the life of your tire, it can come in handy when replacing a tire and matching existing tires or looking up the proper inflation pressure for the tire. It’s also important to know how to read the manufacture date on tires, especially if you are getting a used tire from someone.

When you buy new or used tires from the TireZoo, we carefully inspect tires to make sure you are getting quality, reliable tires. There can be a lot wrong with used tires, so you need to go to some place you can trust, like the TireZoo, or make yourself very knowledgeable about tires.

How to Read the Side of Your Tire

The sidewall will have a series of numbers from left to right. The first letter is the TYPE of tire it is. For most people it is a P for passenger vehicle tires. Next is TIRE WIDTH, ASPECT RATIO, and the CONSTRUCTION. The construction is usually “Radial”. Next comes WHEEL DIAMETER, LOAD INDEX, and SPEED RATING.  To learn more about speed rating, read “Tire Speed Rating Explained”.

Tire Manufacture Date

You’ll also see DOT on the tire. After that is a series of numbers with a four digit number at the end signalling a week and year the tire was manufactured. (2314 would be the 23th week of the 2014 year).

Do you have a question about tires that we can answer for you? Let us know in the comments below or Contact Us today.

Tips When Driving Carpool

driving carpoolWhether you are driving carpool to and from work or school, it can be a cost effective and time reducing option for many. Here are a few tips to help you with your driving carpool experience.

Cheat Sheet: Keep a cheat sheet of addresses and start/end times in the car. It’s easy to assume you’ll remember this simple data, but it can be handy on a hectic day. Things to include: Who attends which school, time each school starts, time each school ends, time to arrive at each work place or transit station, addresses and/or alternative routes.

Carpool Lane and Stalls: When traveling in the Twin Cities metro area or other roads that offer carpool lanes, it’s a great idea to take advantage of this. To refresh your knowledge of how the Minnesota carpool lanes work in the metro and some frequently asked questions, click here. In some cases, parking lots and drop off zones will have specially marked carpool parking that is very useful!

Reminders: Make sure you remind young kids to use the bathroom prior to long commutes. Identify a bathroom along the route for emergencies. Remind everyone where they will find you or where to meet up.

Trash Container: Let’s face it. Traveling with anyone, young or old, usually means extra trash in the vehicle. Empty coffee cups, Kleenex, wrappers, and more need a place to go. Use a designated bag or container to collect carpool trash.

Seat Belts and Car Seats: Make sure all your seat belts are dug out of the seats, and you’ve reviewed any child car seat/booster seat laws. Require seat belt use for your passengers utilizing both the Minnesota Law AND your personal traveling rules for passengers. Here are current child safety seat belt and restraint laws.

Visit our board on Pinterest for great travel snack ideas for kids, if your kids need to maximize their time to fit in a snack on the way to practice or while driving a longer carpool. We have pinned some ideas that are easy to transport and eat in a vehicle.

New Uses for Old Tires at the Cabin

Let’s hope we have a long, mild fall to keep enjoying our outside and cabin activities. However, as autumn arrives, we start winterizing and making lists of projects to get down either yet this fall or first thing in the spring. Here are a few uses for old tires at the cabin that may come in handy.new uses for old tires

Stairs: Use tires filled with gravel to create rustic steps down steep hills.

Dock: Use tires to protect your boat and other water toys from hitting the dock. Use a series of tires on water structures for safer storage of canoes, kayaks, paddle boats when resting out of the water.

Play Area: Create a tire swing, climbing wall, ladder to a tree house, or sand box. Partially buried (upright) tires make interesting, and softer climbing structures for toddlers.

Lawn Games: A series of tires buried half in the ground makes a great semi-permanent croquet or mini-golf course through rustic property. Upright tires can serve as target practice for artery, pitching practice for softball or baseball, and more. Use old tires partial buried and filled with sand around horse shoe pits.

Wind-Proof: Need help making something more sturdy? Keep your rain water retention bucket upright by placing an old tire around it. Use tires to keep potted plants and flower from tipping, outside garbage cans, compost bins, and more.

Visit us on Pinterest where we’ve dedicated a board to new uses for old tires. We’ve pinned many pictures and articles on how to do lots of creative things with old tires.

How have you found a new use for old tires? Please share.